Art and Literature
Trending

Analysis of Williams Wordworth’s “The World is Too Much With Us ” as a Romantic Poem

Analysis of Williams Wordworth’s “The World is Too Much With Us ” as a Romantic Poem

Introduction

What is the message of the world is too much with us?

The world is too much with us theme

Allusion in the world is too much with us

Alliteration in the world is too much with us

Having noticed the frequently asked questions on the Williams Wordworth’s “The World is Too Much With Us” we we shall take our time to analyse the poem as a romantic poem, as well as analyse the literary device line by line as they feature in the literary work.

Williams Wordworth’s “The World is Too Much With Us” Poem

The world is too much with us late and soon

Getting and spending we lay waste our powers:

Little we see in Nature that is ours;

We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon!

This sea that bears her bosom to the moon

The winds that will be howling at all hours

And are up gather now as sleeping flowers

For this, for everything, we are out of tune

It moves us not, Great God! I'd rather be

A Pagan suckled in a creed out worn

So might I, standing on this pleasant lea.

Have glimpse that would make me less forlorn

Or hear Old Triton blow his wreathed horn.

Recommended: Analysis and Meaning of Metaphysical, Romantic and Negritude Poetry

Analysis of Williams Wordworth’s The “World is Too Much With Us ” as a Romantic Poem

On reading this poem, it will be found out that the poet gives a complaint. The complaint is that human beings do not appreciate nature. Take note that the word nature is written honourifically as Nature as if it were a name of human being or God which first letter must always be in capital form. This is an element of PASSION for which a romantic poet is distinguished. Wordsworth uses such a passion to equate nature to purity or holiness. He accuses human “beings of cherishing worldly things that are inconsequential which he puts as a sordid boon” in line 4. Take note that something sordid is worthless, while boon means a free-gift.

N. B. This means that human beings so much like worthless things in their great numbers in a way a great number of people will run to partake in the collection of free gifts

Again, one will see that the poet establishes himself as being different from other human beings. This he displays by showing himself as the only person who adores or loves nature deep down his heart. Others whom he addresses in this poem do not.

N. B. This is the element of contrast peculiar to romantic poetry.

Wordsworth displays another contrast by using details of the beauty, attractiveness and perfectiness of wind, flowers, green grass (i.e pleasant leas), the tide (wave-like flowing of sea water and white bubbles) from the water which he describes through the classical allusions in

“….Proteus rising from the sea….

….Old Triton blows his wreathed horn….”

RECOMMENDED: Analysis of Dennis Osadebey’s “Young African’s Plea” as a Romantic Poem.

Williams Wordworth further displays another contrast by calling himself a Pagan who will ever separate himself from people who are believers. This is one more illustration of the contrast used by Wordsworth to enjoin his fellow men to accept what he is saying about the need to appreciate nature and other habits that will be pleasing before God Almighty instead of doing otherwise. Clearly, the poem is a sonnet. It contains a b b a a b b a c d c d c d end rhyme scheme.

Figures of Speech and Literary Devices in Williams Wordworth’s “The Word is Too Much With Us “

Recommended: Analysis of John Donnes’ “Death Be Not Proud” as a Metaphysical Poem

In conclusion, the poem exhibits the following discussed figures of speech and literary devices.

Rhyme

Rhyme is a literary devices that is usually associated with the ending of literary line in a poem, thereby making it to seems sound alike though, sometimes with different spelling and meaning.

This device or element could be seen in form of parallelism in lines 5 and 6, 12 and 13.

Oxymoron

Oxymoron is a figure of speech in which two ideas that look contradictory at first are united. The poet applied oxymoron in line 4 of the poem

(i.e . sordid boon)

Enjambment

This is also called run-on-line. This device is usually applied in a literary work where a continuous thought flow is discussed. That is the idea in a line of poem continues in the following line. For example in line 9 and 10

“Great God! I’d rather be
A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn.”

Personification:

Personification is the given the attribute of living thing to inanimate objects. The poet has used personification at several points in this poem such as,

“sea that bears her bosom to the moon”;

“The winds that will be howling at all hours” and “sleeping flowers.”

All these expressions make nature possess human-like qualities like yearning for love, sleeping and soothing.

Allusions

Allusion is always contained when in an expression in which a reference is made to some historical event or activities which had either taken place in the Bible or classical Age.

“Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea;
Or hear old Triton blow his wreathed horn.”

Imagery

The use of imagery makes the readers visualize the writer’s feelings, emotions or ideas. Wordsworth has used images appealing to the sense of hearing such as,

winds that will be howling”

to the sense of touch as

“sleeping flowers;”

and to the sense of sight as

“Proteus rising from the sea.”

Consonance

Consonance is the repetition of consonant sounds in the same line such as the sound;

of /s/ in “Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea”

and /f/ and /t/ sounds in “For this, for everything, we are out of tune.”

Simile

Simile a device used to compare something another thing to let the readers know what it is. There is only one simile used in line seven of the poem,

“And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers;”

The poet has linked the howling of the winds with the sleeping flowers.

Metaphor

Recommended: Analysis of John Donnes’ “Death Be Not Proud” as a Metaphysical Poem

There are two metaphors used in this poem. One of the metaphors is in the tenth line;

“Suckle in a creed outworn.” Here creed represents mother that nurses her child.

Assonance

Assonance is the repetition of vowel sounds in the same line such as

/o/ sound in “Or hear old Triton blow his wreathed horn”.

Davidposh of Campusvibes

I'm a dedicated and progressive individual with an exceptional work ethic and client oriented service aptitude. I write to inform and educate. Currently I'm an English language students Lagos State University.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Back to top button

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker